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PHILOSOPHICAL
LITERARY
JOURNAL
ISSN 0869-5377
Author: Payen Guillaume

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media

Payen Guillaume

Coordinator of the teaching of foreign languages, Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, guillaume.payen@paris-sorbonne.fr. Paris-Sorbonne University (Paris IV), 1 rue Victor Cousin, Paris 75005, France.

Publications

From the Black Notebooks to the End of the “Heidegger Case”? / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 51-90
annotation:  The controversy surrounding Heidegger’s philosophical diaries (known as the Black Notebooks) is the last episode in a lengthy dispute that can be traced back nearly to the Third Reich. When the first three volumes were published in 2014, the debate was rekindled primarily by Emmanuel Faye’s Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy, which was by far the most virulent (although in some ways stimulating) book written against the master of Freiburg. Faye refused to regard Heidegger as a philosopher and accused him of instigating the Holocaust. However, until 2014 the broad consensus had been that the philosopher opposed Nazi biologism and anti-Semitism. With the publication of the first volumes of the Black Notebooks that interpretation became untenable for the vast majority of scholars, including some of the most fervent Heideggerians. Peter Trawny, the editor of those philosophical diaries, has insisted that they contain the notion of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that was derived from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Donatella di Cesare, former vice-president of the Heidegger Society, came up with the idea that Heidegger believed the Jews had exterminated themselves. Although Faye’s book has certainly prompted the current controversy, it has been fueled and spread even more by massive use of the internet, which opens this cache of “newly discovered evidence” to anyone interested.
Keywords:  Heidegger controversy; Black Notebooks; Anti-Semitism; reception his¬tory of Nazism; history of mass media
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